making waves

At ASL club last night, I found out that due to student interest, there is the possibility that an ASL class could be offered for credit in upcoming semesters. While that is still very uncertain, I was excited to hear that it might be a possibility.

There is also an interest in introducing ASL as a minor, which would be wonderful. Unfortunately, I would not be able to have that minor since I am too far along academically to fit it into my plan. I wish that that would become an option for others though, since there is a need for people who are skilled in ASL.

If the class becomes a reality, I will do my best to be able to fit it into my schedule. I would love to take actual, structured classes especially if I decide to continue pursuing studies in ASL after I graduate. Having real classes and not just self-teaching would be very beneficial for me to enter another school’s ASL program.

I will also strongly support efforts to make ASL a potential minor for students. My school already offers other foreign language minors, so I feel that it would not be too overzealous to hope for ASL to become one of those options in the future.

For now, I will continue to support efforts to instate a for-credit sign language course, and hope to see it become a reality before I graduate.

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branching out

I started working with a new ASL program yesterday in addition to the free online courses through StartASL. My second lesson program is a DVD based program called Learn and Master Sign Language.

So far, I have finished one lesson and found this to be a very helpful program. Although the first lesson was familiar to me since I have already had a basic introduction to ASL and finger-spelling, it would have been excellent for a true beginner.

I think this program will be helpful as I learn to read and not just sign ASL, and the videos also include sections on Deaf Culture, which I found very interesting. One of the instructors is deaf, and is able to offer valuable insights on how a hearing person can respectfully interact with Deaf people.